Have you had one of those moments.  That time when a light bulb comes on and you wonder, “Why have I never thought of that before?”  Well, I have had “that moment,” and I will never go back.  (Actually, I copied the idea from online and added my own spin to it.  I’ll claim it as “my” moment anyway.)

Windows are expensive!!!  First, if you ever, ever had to replace a window, you begin to have thoughts of nailing plywood boards over the hole instead.  Then if you DO decide to put glass in instead of plywood, then you have thoughts of just hanging a blanket purchased at Goodwill over the very expensive piece of glass.  There’s a plot out there by somebody to rob the world of precious money simply through their windows.

(Yes, we have Goodwill blankets over some of our windows.  Don’t judge.)

But, eventually the blankets must come down and something a little purdier must go up (in my opinion).  Blinds, curtains, curtain rods, curtain rod hanger thingies…you could EASILY spend over $100 on each window (and that’s buying the cheap stuff).  Well, I have a solution.  And I will no longer buy curtain rods for $30 – $45 a piece.  I  WILL MAKE THEM!!!

It. Is. So. Simple…and cheap.

Materials (all from Lowes):

     ~ rod (I bought electrical conduit, but in my experimenting, I will use a wood dowel in the future)

     ~ finial

     ~ bracket hardware = L bracket, one hole conduit strap, nuts and bolts

     ~ spray paint = primer and final color

     ~ glue and wood dowel (if using electrical conduit for rod)

Step 1:  Cut conduit or wood dowel to desired length.  (The only downside to these is they can’t be adjusted to different lengths.  The upside is that you don’t have that silly bump thing that the curtains get hung up on when you open and close them.)

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Step 2:  Assemble L bracket and conduit bracket to make rod bracket.  (This is really the easiest thing ever to do.  I did it while watching TV.)

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Step 3:  This was a little tricky since I used hollow metal electrical conduit.  Cut a piece of wood dowel.  Drill a hole for the finial.  Glue dowel into electrical conduit.  The gluing part eventually worked out but too longer than necessary, which is why I’ll just spend an extra $1.50 next time and use the wood dowel as the entire rod in the first place.

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Step 4:  Paint everything with primer and then your final color.  (I use oil rubbed bronze paint for pretty much everything in the house.)

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Step 5:  Mount brackets on wall.  I also put a little strip of the non-slip rug gripper thing in the brackets so the rod wouldn’t, ummm, slip.

One of our windows is a sliding glass door.  I made double rod brackets for that one with end caps instead of finials.  The process is the same.  The end caps are just the rubber tips you can buy to put on chair legs.  They match…that’s all I cared about.

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So, here are the curtain rods we bought for our front room…

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…and here are the ones I made.

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~ My cost:  $10.00 for single window rods/$16 for double rod sliding glass door

     = Total of $56.00 (for four windows and one sliding glass door)

~ Store cost:  $26 for single rod/$46 – $60 for double rod

~ Total savings: $150 – $164.00

~ Time involved:  About 2 hours with all the experimenting (next time I could probably knock it out in 1 hour)

~ My “pay” per hour in savings (tax free income!!!):  $47 – $54/hour

Not.A.Bad.”Salary”

And I wonder sometimes why I like DIY.

 

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